Image of orchestra performing in london

Beethoven 250

Beethoven In The City

NINE SYMPHONIES – NINE VENUES
ACROSS THE HEART OF THE CITY OF LONDON

Music as Beethoven would have experienced it, on instruments of the time.

March-December 2020 

The Band has devised an innovative programme for the coming year which will see all of Beethoven’s symphonies played in venues across London over the coming months. The individual halls have been chosen because they are similar to the venues Beethoven would have expected his music to be played in, with more intimate audiences, rather than the vast concert halls of today.

The Hanover Band will also be showcasing Beethoven’s music on instruments of the age rather than modern day instruments, so not only are the venues more authentic, but the sounds are too.

The City series culminates with Beethoven’s famous 9th (Choral) symphony on the composer’s actual birthday 16 December 2020, featuring The Hanover Band Chorus and including the well known ‘Ode To Joy’.

The concerts are particularly focussed on encouraging younger generations to experience Beethoven and enjoy classical music in general. The Hanover Band is offering tickets free to all those aged 30 and under and is running a series of interactive afternoon school workshops before each event.

A CONCERT A MONTH:

01: Stationers’ Hall
Monday 2 March 2020 • 18.30 
BEETHOVEN SYMPHONY No. 4 Op.60 

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02: Clothworkers’ Hall 
Monday 27 April 2020 • 18.30 
BEETHOVEN SYMPHONY No. 6 Op.68 ‘PASTORAL’ 

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03: Goldsmiths’ Hall
Monday 18 May 2020 • 18.30 
BEETHOVEN SYMPHONY No. 8 Op.93 

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04: Grocers’ Hall 
Performance at St Stephen Walbrook 
Monday 1 June 2020 • 18.30 
BEETHOVEN SYMPHONY No. 2 Op.36 

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05: Ironmongers’ Hall
Monday 6 July 2020 • 18.30 
BEETHOVEN SYMPHONY No. 5 Op.67 

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06: Pattenmakers 
Performance at St Margaret Pattens 
Monday 14 September 2020 • 18.30 
BEETHOVEN SYMPHONY No. 1 Op.21

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07: Drapers’ Hall
Monday 12 October 2020 • 18.30
BEETHOVEN SYMPHONY No. 3 Op.55 ‘EROICA’

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08: Leathersellers’ Hall
Monday 9 November 2020 • 18.30
BEETHOVEN SYMPHONY No. 7 Op.92 

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09: Mansion House
Wednesday 16 December 2020 • 18.30 
BEETHOVEN SYMPHONY No. 9 Op.125 ‘CHORAL’ 

View Concert

   

Lord Mayor of London, William Russell, has described the multi-date event as

“an imaginative city salute to Beethoven’s 250th birthday”.

He adds: “The Hanover Band involves school workshops and concerts and is aimed particularly at young people who will be tomorrow’s musicians and concert-goers, freemen and liverymen. 

“As a way of opening young ears to fine music, and young eyes to the work and relevance of the city’s livery companies, it deserves all our support and I for one commend it whole-heartedly.”

This unique programme is the legacy of the Hanover Band’s founder, cellist Caroline Brown, who was heavily inspired by Beethoven during her own musical career and meticulously planned the concerts prior to her death.

The symphonies are being performed as a tribute to her.

Twitter

A joyous Messiah tonight in Arundel beautifully performed by @TheHanoverBand @ericaeloff @BradSmithTenor @WhackemnSloggem @MisterGravel 🙏👏👏👏👏

Still buzzing from a mind-blowingly exciting performance of Handel’s #Messiah by @TheHanoverBand at St George’s Church, Brighton earlier this evening. It was as if I was hearing it for the first time. And such wonderful connection between performers and audience. Hallelujah!

Whether you're singing #hallelujah or feel that "we like sheep have gone astray" why not forget about it and come and listen to our #Messiah? Under 30s free! #Handel

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The Hanover Band

HANOVER (Not Hannover; Germany) In terms of British history the majority of the music we play is from the Hanoverian period. Hanover also refers to Hanover Square in London, where Haydn performed his symphonies and arias in the Salomon Concerts in the 1790’s.

BAND (ref: The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians)
‘An instrumental ensemble, larger than a chamber ensemble. Thus the ’24 violins’ of Louis XIV were called ‘la grande bande’ to distinguish them from Lully’s ‘petits violons’, and Charles II’s similar ensemble was known as ‘the King’s Band’. By extension, ‘band’ came to mean an orchestra in colloquial British usage’.

THE HANOVER BAND a period name for a period orchestra.

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